Sports Injuries? We can help...

Low back injuries in gymnasts, dancers and figure skaters

Gymnasts, dancers and figure skaters often amaze us with their flexibility and grace, but with this flexibility the need for stability and control is essential. For example, a gymnast doing a back handspring requires a significant amount of extension in their low back to complete this maneuver. Ideally, each vertebra in their lower spine (lumbar spine) would contribute to the overall movement into extension. However, this does not always happen. Sometimes one joint does much more of the movement and other joints may be tight, this can overload the joint that is doing more of the work. Overloading the joint can cause pain and in extreme cases cause stress fractures in the vertebra. Physiotherapists are trained to assess body movement through observation and a hands-on approach that assesses the quantity and quality of the mobility of each spinal segment. The physiotherapist will determine if the problem or injury is the result of a dysfunctional movement pattern or motor control issue and help make an individualized plan of care to aid in recovery from this injury. Our skilled physiotherapists can help you move like you should!

Swimmer's shoulder

Is it any wonder that with such repetitive arm movements swimmers can develop shoulder pain? This shoulder pain is aggravated most frequently with freestyle and butterfly strokes and is usually felt in the front or side of the shoulder. Terms like impingement, bursitis and rotator cuff tendonitis are often terms used to describe this type of shoulder pain. Depending on the level of swimmer and training kilometres, a swimmer may take thousands of strokes per week. This is ultimately why stroke technique is so very important. Did you know that entering the water with the thumb first rather than the middle finger may cause pinching and irritation of the tendons of the shoulder? Recovery of the arms over the water is just as important and requires not only shoulder mobility but spinal mobility as well. Even little changes in stroke technique can make a big difference when done so repetitively. A physiotherapist is trained to assess body movement through observation and a hands-on approach that assesses the quantity and quality of movement in the shoulder and spine. Treatment often includes exercises focused on strengthening of postural and shoulder blade muscles as well as the rotator cuff. Your physiotherapist can help identify points in your stroke where you may be more at risk for injury. Our physiotherapists can help you move like you should!